We use cookies to provide essential features and services. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies .

×

COVID-19 Response at Fishpond

Read what we're doing...

Amalia
By

Rating

Product Description
Product Details

About the Author

Helen Lane has translated the work of Mario Vargas Llosa and Octavio Paz, and is the translator of Fray Servando's Memoirs for the Library of Latin America series. She lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Doris Sommer is the chair of the Department of Romance Languages at Harvard University.

Reviews

Originally published serially in 1851, Amalia is generally considered to be the Argentinean national novel and, until recently, was required reading in that country's schools. Set in Buenos Aires in 1840 during an unsuccessful uprising against the rule of the cruel Federalist dictator Juan Manuel de Rosas, Amalia is part political allegory and part love story. The love story involves Eduardo Belgrano, stalwart Unitarian and nephew of an earlier Argentinean revolutionary hero. While trying to emigrate, Eduardo is attacked by Rosas's thugs but then saved by Daniel Bello, his dashing and crafty best friend and taken to the home of Daniel's beautiful widowed cousin, Amalia. She and Eduardo quickly fall in love, though their relationship is impeded by his status as a wanted man. Meanwhile, Daniel, who masquerades as a dedicated Federalist, is organizing behind the scenes to deliver the capital to the Unitarian troops, who are poised to attack. While the novel has the potential to appeal to readers of 19th-century fiction generally, this scholarly edition will find its audience primarily in academia. Lawrence Rungren, Merrimack Valley Lib. Consortium, Andover, MA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

"Language has always been a barrier to our unity as the Americas, and most especially to our reading of each other's literatures. Now with this new series by Oxford University Press, the library of Latin America is literally open to North Americans and to English speakers everywhere. This is an important series for anyone who is prevented from knowing the classics of the southern half of this hemisphere because of not knowing the language. !Bienvenidos to these new readers!"-Julia Alvarez "Language has always been a barrier to our unity as the Americas, and most especially to our reading of each other's literatures. Now with this new series by Oxford University Press, the library of Latin America is literally open to North Americans and to English speakers everywhere. This is an important series for anyone who is prevented from knowing the classics of the southern half of this hemisphere because of not knowing the language. !Bienvenidos to these new readers!"-Julia Alvarez "With the Library of Latin America, Oxford has opened up a new frontier that may prove as exciting and enigmatic as the continent itself."--The Herald, South Carolina PRAISE FOR PREVIOUS LIBRARY OF LATIN AMERICA EDITIONS "The first four volumes in Oxford's series, it can safely be said, herald it as the most significant publishing event in Latin American literature in this country since the Boom of the 1960s."-The Wall Street Journal

Ask a Question About this Product More...
Write your question below:
Look for similar items by category
People also searched for
Item ships from and is sold by Fishpond Retail Limited.
Back to top