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The End of Ideology
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Table of Contents

The Resumption of History in the New Century Introduction: The Restless Vanity PART 1: AMERICA: THE AMBIGUITIES OF THEORY 1. America as a Mass Society: A Critique 2. The Breakup of Family Capitalism: On Changes in Class in America 3. Is There a Ruling Class in America? The Power Elite Reconsidered 4. The Prospects of American Capitalism: On Keynes, Schumpeter and Gaibraith 5. The Refractions of the American Past: On the Question of National Character 6. Status Politics and New Anxieties: On the "Radical Right" and Ideologies of the Fifties PART 2: AMERICA: THE COMPLEXITIES OF LIFE 7. Crime as an American Way of Life: A Queer Ladder of Social Mobility 8. The Myth of Crime Waves: The Actual Decline of Crime in the United States 9. The Racket-Ridden Longshoremen: The Web of Economics and Politics 10. The Capitalism of the Proletariat: A Theory of American Trade-Unionism 11. Work and its Discontents: The Cult of Efficiency in America PART 3: THE EXHAUSTION OF UTOPIA 12. The Failure of American Socialism: The Tension of Ethics and Politics 13. The Mood of Three Generations: A. The Once-Born, the Twice-Born, and the After-Born B. The Loss of Innocence in the Thirties C. Politics in the Forties D. Dissent in the Fifties 14. Ten Theories in Search of Reality: The Prediction of Soviet Behavior 15. Two Roads from Marx: The Themes of Alienation and Exploitation and Workers' Control in Socialist Thought The End of Ideology in the West: An Epilogue Afterword, 1988: The End of Ideology Revisited Acknowledgment Notes Index

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A very polished book. The overall argument on the relationship of declining religious and rising national feeling is highly appropriate and particularly significant. Bell is obviously completely conversant with recent work by Habermas, Chartier, Gordon, Baker, and Crow, to name but a few authors whose findings he weaves into his own purpose. I was also taken with his thought on the relationship between national feeling in France and the awareness of France's changing place in the world, and with that, of Britain's surprisingly swift advance from 1688 to the middle decades of the eighteenth century. His pages on 'Great Men' as the vehicles of national sentiment are likewise very thoughtful. -- Patrice Higonnet, author of Goodness Beyond Virtue Praise for earlier editions: The End of Ideology was one of the most influential, most controversial, and most misunderstood books about the 1950s. But it is not simply a central text of the intellectual history of those years (although it certainly is that). It is also a provocative discussion by one of America's most creative thinkers of political and philosophical issues that concern us still. -- Alan Brinkley No one could consider himself politically literate without an intimate knowledge of the issues foreseen in The End of Ideology. -- Theodore Draper

About the Author

Daniel Bell was Henry Ford II Professor of Social Sciences, Emeritus, Harvard University.

Reviews

A very polished book. The overall argument on the relationship of declining religious and rising national feeling is highly appropriate and particularly significant. Bell is obviously completely conversant with recent work by Habermas, Chartier, Gordon, Baker, and Crow, to name but a few authors whose findings he weaves into his own purpose. I was also taken with his thought on the relationship between national feeling in France and the awareness of France's changing place in the world, and with that, of Britain's surprisingly swift advance from 1688 to the middle decades of the eighteenth century. His pages on 'Great Men' as the vehicles of national sentiment are likewise very thoughtful. -- Patrice Higonnet, author of Goodness Beyond Virtue
Praise for earlier editions:
The End of Ideology was one of the most influential, most controversial, and most misunderstood books about the 1950s. But it is not simply a central text of the intellectual history of those years (although it certainly is that). It is also a provocative discussion by one of America's most creative thinkers of political and philosophical issues that concern us still.-- Alan Brinkley
No one could consider himself politically literate without an intimate knowledge of the issues foreseen in The End of Ideology. -- Theodore Draper
Originally published in 1960, this collection of essays focuses on the protean nature of American society and the decay of Marxism and other systematic ideologies in the West...Arthur Schlesinger Jr. [has] admired the book's 'unflagging confidence, trenchancy, and authority.' -- Scott Veale * New York Times Book Review *

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