We use cookies to provide essential features and services. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies .

×

COVID-19 Response at Fishpond

Read what we're doing...

Forensic Psychology
By

Rating

Product Description
Product Details

Table of Contents

Contributors xv Preface to Third Edition xix About the Editors xxi About the Companion Website xxiii INTRODUCTION Graham M. Davies, Anthony R. Beech and Clive Hollin 1 Forensic Psychology 3 How to Become a Forensic Psychologist 13 Professional Organisations for Forensic Psychologists 14 Structure and Content of This Book 16 PART 1 The Causes of Crime 23 CHAPTER 1 Psychological Approaches to Understanding Crime 25 Emma J. Palmer 1.1 Introduction 27 1.2 Psychological Theories 27 1.3 Theories, Evidence, and Crime 31 1.4 Mentally Disordered Offenders 39 1.5 Conclusions 46 1.6 Summary 47 CHAPTER 2 Developmental and Psychological Theories of Offending 55 David P. Farrington and Maria M. Ttofi 2.1 Introduction 57 2.2 Developmental Theories 57 2.3 Case Studies From the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development 63 2.4 Psychological Theories 64 2.5 The ICAP Theory 72 2.6 Conclusions 75 2.7 Summary 76 CHAPTER 3 Psychopathy 83 Steven M. Gillespie and Ian J. Mitchell 3.1 Introduction 85 3.2 Assessment of Psychopathy 86 3.3 Psychopathy and Aggression 90 3.4 Correlates of Psychopathy in Adolescents and Children 91 3.5 Genetic Basis of Psychopathy 92 3.6 Family Factors Associated with the Development of Psychopathy 93 3.7 Attachment, Psychopathy and Offending 93 3.8 Facial Expression Recognition 94 3.9 Psychopathy and Aversive Conditioning 97 3.10 Neurochemistry of Psychopathy 98 3.11 Conclusions 99 3.12 Summary 100 CHAPTER 4 Understanding Risk Factors for Offending: The Contributions of Neuroscience 107 Anthony R. Beech, Benjamin Nordstrom, Adrian Raine and Dawn Fisher 4.1 Introduction 109 4.2 The Development of the Brain 109 4.3 The Social Brain 110 4.4 Risk Factors for Offending 115 4.5 Modifying Environmental Risk Factors 128 4.6 Summary 129 CHAPTER 5 Effects of Interpersonal Crime on Victims 139 Catherine Hamilton-Giachritsis and Emma Sleath 5.1 Introduction 141 5.2 Childhood Victimisation 141 5.3 Adulthood Victimisation 152 5.4 Summary 161 PART 2 Investigating Crime 171 CHAPTER 6 Eyewitness Evidence 173 Harriet M. J. Smith, Hannah Ryder and Heather D. Flowe 6.1 Introduction 175 6.2 The Memory Process 176 6.3 Estimator vs. System Variables 177 6.4 Encoding Factors 177 6.5 Storage Factors 183 6.6 Retrieval Factors 189 6.7 Conclusions 192 6.8 Summary 192 CHAPTER 7 Interviewing Witnesses 201 Allison P. Mugno, Lindsay C. Malloy and David J. La Rooy 7.1 Introduction 203 7.2 Shortcomings and Consequences of Traditional Investigative Interviews 204 7.3 The Cognitive Interview (Ci) 206 7.4 Interviewing Vulnerable Witnesses 211 7.5 Summary 223 CHAPTER 8 Interviewing Suspects 231 Erik Mac Giolla and Par Anders Granhag 8.1 Introduction 233 8.2 What Officers are Advised to Do 233 8.3 What Officers Do 236 8.4 What Officers Should and Should Not Do 238 8.5 Conclusions 247 8.6 Summary 248 CHAPTER 9 Detecting Deception 255 Par Anders Granhag and Maria Hartwig 9.1 Introduction 257 9.2 Theoretical Approaches to Deception 257 9.3 Objective Cues to Deception 259 9.4 Lie-Catchers' Performance 259 9.5 Detecting Deception from Verbal Content 262 9.6 Computer-Based Linguistic Analysis 264 9.7 Psycho-Physiological Detection of Deception 265 9.8 Strategic Interviewing in Order to Elicit and Enhance Cues to Deception 269 9.9 New Directions in Deception Detection Research 273 9.10 Training to Detect Deception 275 9.11 Conclusions 276 9.12 Summary 276 CHAPTER 10 Offender Profiling and Crime Linkage 283 Jessica Woodhams and Matthew Tonkin 10.1 Introduction 285 10.2 Crime Linkage 285 10.3 Offender Profiling 292 10.4 Summary 300 CHAPTER 11 Interpersonal Violence and Stalking 307 Louise Dixon and Erica Bowen 11.1 Introduction 309 11.2 Definitions and Terminology 309 11.3 Lifetime and 12-Month Prevalence Rates of Intimate Partner Violence and Stalking 313 11.4 Risk Factors and Theories 317 11.5 Subtypes of Perpetrators 322 11.6 Implications for Practice: Risk Assessment 326 11.7 Summary 327 CHAPTER 12 Terrorism 335 Max Taylor 12.1 Introduction 337 12.2 What Are Terrorists, and What is Terrorism? 337 12.3 The Psychology of Terrorism 339 12.4 Becoming, Remaining, Disengaging 342 12.5 Radicalisation 348 12.6 Progression into Terrorist Activities: Autobiographical and Biographical Accounts 352 12.7 Disengagement 354 12.8 Suicide Terrorism and Political Suicide 355 12.9 Assessment of Dangerousness 357 12.10 Summary 358 PART 3 The Trial Process 365 CHAPTER 13 Judicial Processes 367 Jacqueline M. Wheatcroft 13.1 Introduction 369 13.2 Understanding the Justice System 369 13.3 Evidence in Court 372 13.4 Judges as Decision-Makers 379 13.5 Juries as Decision-Makers 382 13.6 Conclusions 389 13.7 Summary 390 CHAPTER 14 Safeguarding Vulnerable Witnesses 399 Graham M. Davies and Helen L. Westcott 14.1 Introduction 401 14.2 Witnesses' Fears and Perceptions about Going to Court 402 14.3 Preparing Witnesses for Court: Preparation and Social Support in Theory and Practice 404 14.4 Protecting Witnesses at Court Through Special Measures 408 14.5 Still Unmet Needs 415 14.6 Conclusions 419 14.7 Summary 420 CHAPTER 15 Identifying Perpetrators 427 Tim Valentine 15.1 Introduction 429 15.2 The Problem of Mistaken Identification 429 15.3 Eyewitness Identification and Human Memory 429 15.4 Design Requirements of Identification Procedures 431 15.5 Estimator Variables 434 15.6 System Variables 439 15.7 Malleability of Witness Confidence 446 15.8 Official Guidance 447 15.9 Identification From CCTV 448 15.10 Conclusions 450 15.11 Summary 451 CHAPTER 16 The Role of the Expert Witness 457 Daniel T. Wilcox and Leam A. Craig 16.1 Introduction 459 16.2 Taking Instruction 459 16.3 Expert in Content and Process 460 16.4 Evidence on Clinical Factors 463 16.5 Standard of Proof 467 16.6 Providing an Expert Opinion 469 16.7 Giving Oral Evidence at Court 471 16.8 Conclusions 475 16.9 Summary 476 PART 4 Dealing with Offenders 479 CHAPTER 17 Crime and Punishment: What Works? 481 James McGuire 17.1 Introduction 483 17.2 The Sentence of the Court 484 17.3 The Objectives of Sentencing 485 17.4 The Impact of Sentencing 490 17.5 Reducing Offending Behaviour 494 17.6 Psychological Contributions to Offender Assessment and Management 504 17.7 Summary 505 CHAPTER 18 Risk Assessment and General Offender Behaviour Programme Delivery 513 Ruth Hatcher 18.1 Introduction 515 18.2 Risk Assessment within Offender Management 516 18.3 Methods of Assessing Risk 518 18.4 Risk and Need Instruments for Offenders 519 18.5 Treatment Delivery 529 18.6 General Offending Behaviour Programmes 530 18.7 Evaluation of General Offending Behaviour Programmes 533 18.8 Issues Related to Offending Behaviour Programmes 534 18.9 Summary 537 CHAPTER 19 Treating Dangerous Offenders 545 Leigh Harkins, Jayson Ware and Ruth Mann 19.1 Introduction 547 19.2 Types of Dangerous Offenders Typically Treated in a Criminal Justice Setting 548 19.3 Treatment Frameworks 552 19.4 The Evidence Base for the Treatment of Dangerous Offenders 564 19.5 Considerations in Working with Dangerous Offenders 567 19.6 Summary 570 CHAPTER 20 Interventions with Female Offenders 579 Franca Cortoni and Nathalie M. G. Fontaine 20.1 Introduction 581 20.2 Antisocial Behaviour in Adolescent Females 581 20.3 Adult Female Offenders 587 20.4 Summary 595 CHAPTER 21 Interventions for Offenders with Intellectual Disabilities 601 William R. Lindsay, John L. Taylor and Amanda M. Michie 21.1 Introduction 603 21.2 The Prevalence of ID in Offender Populations 603 21.3 ID As a Risk Factor for Offending 605 21.4 Assessment of Offenders with ID 605 21.5 Interventions with Offenders with ID 614 21.6 Autism Spectrum Disorders and Crime 626 21.7 Summary 628 CHAPTER 22 Interventions with Mentally Disordered Offenders 637 Dawn Fisher, Michelle Ginty, Jagjit Sandhu and Nuwan Galappathie 22.1 Introduction 639 22.2 History of Forensic Mental Health Services 640 22.3 Types of Mental Illness/Forensic Behaviours Seen in Forensic Mental Health Services 642 22.4 Legislation Pertaining to Mentally Disordered Offenders 650 22.5 The Role of the Psychologist in Forensic Mental Health Settings 653 22.6 Summary 657 CHAPTER 23 The Rehabilitation of Offenders: Good Lives and Risk Reduction 661 Tony Ward and Gwenda M. Willis 23.1 Introduction 663 23.2 What is the Nature of Offender Rehabilitation? 665 23.3 What are the Features of Effective Offender Rehabilitation? 667 23.4 Desistance From Crime 671 23.5 The Risk-Need-Responsivity Model of Offender Rehabilitation 673 23.6 Limitations of the Risk-Need-Responsivity Model 673 23.7 The Good Lives Model 676 23.8 Summary 682 Glossary 689 Index 705

About the Author

Graham M. Davies is Emeritus Professor of Psychology at the University of Leicester and an Honorary Professor of Forensic Psychology at the Universities of Birmingham and Coventry, UK. His research interests focus on the testimony of children and adults and the support of vulnerable witnesses at court, on which topics he has published 10 books and over 150 articles in scientific journals. He is a Fellow of the British Psychological Society and was the recipient of the Senior Award from the British Psychological Society Division of Forensic Psychology for a significant lifetime contribution to Forensic Psychology in 2012. Anthony R. Beech is an Emeritus Professor of Criminological Psychology at the University of Birmingham, UK. He has authored over 180 peer-reviewed articles, 50 book chapters and eight books in the area of forensic science/criminal justice. He is a Fellow of the British Psychological Society and was the recipient of the Senior Award from the British Psychological Society Division of Forensic Psychology for a significant lifetime contribution to Forensic Psychology in 2009. He also received the Significant Achievement award from the US-based Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers (ATSA) in 2009.

Ask a Question About this Product More...
Write your question below:
Item ships from and is sold by Fishpond Retail Limited.
Back to top