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The Great Rabbit Rescue
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About the Author

Katie Davies knows a thing or two about animal disasters. Her first book, The Great Hamster Massacre, was inspired by true events--when she was twelve years old, after a relentless begging campaign, she was given two Russian Dwarf hamsters for Christmas. She has yet to recover from what happened to those hamsters. Katie lives with her husband and daughter in North London. Visit her at KatieDaviesBooks.com. Hannah Shaw was born into a large family of sprout-munching vegetarians. She lives in a little cottage in the Cotswolds with her husband, Ben the blacksmith, and her rescue dog, Ren. She finds that her overactive imagination fuels new ideas, but unfortunately it keeps her awake at night!

Reviews

"This gentler sequel [to The Great Hamster Massacre] again showcases Davies' laconic style and deadpan humor, so well-matched to the chapter-book format. Neatly complementing the text, Shaw's sly, witty illustrations, pie charts and graphics are a treat. A welcome return for the indomitable Anna."

--Kirkus Reviews, November 15, 2011


"Readers will enjoy Anna's narration, which has an animated, slightly rambling style that really sounds like how a nine-year-old would tell a story. It's also a joy to read about a group of children who spend most of their time playing make-believe games rather than parking themselves in front of a screen. Line drawings pepper the text, giving the book a "Wimpy Kid" feel."

--School Library Journal, January 2012

Gr 3-5-Nine-year-old Anna loves to play make-believe games, so she really gets into the role of "rabbit bodyguard" when Joe-down-the-street moves in with his father and has to leave his rabbit at his mother's house. Deserting his pet is a huge source of anxiety because he fears the worst will happen if it is unprotected. Anna, her little brother, and a friend decide to take up guard duty, but in the process they unwittingly nearly kill the animal. Tense middle-of-the-night drama ensues, but fortunately all ends well. Making the ending even happier is the fact that Joe will be moving back in with his mom, which is where he wanted to live all along. Readers will enjoy Anna's narration, which has an animated, slightly rambling style that really sounds like how a nine-year-old would tell a story. It's also a joy to read about a group of children who spend most of their time playing make-believe games rather than parking themselves in front of a screen. Line drawings pepper the text, giving the book a "Wimpy Kid" feel. On the downside, animal lovers may have a hard time reading about the rabbit being sick. Also, it seems odd that Anna, Suzanne, and Tom don't express guilt or remorse over almost killing the rabbit. Overall, this sequel to The Great Hamster Massacre (S & S, 2011) is a nonessential purchase.-Amy Holland, Irondequoit Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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