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The Naming of Names
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The Tulip sold nearly 200,000 copies in the UK and US alone Illustrated in full colour throughout

With this book, British author Pavord (The Tulip) quashes any notion that the history of plant taxonomy is a dull pursuit. Her story covers 2000 years of the search for order in the plant world, beginning in third-century B.C.E. Greece with Aristotle's great pupil Theophrastus and ending in late 17th-century England with the man who coined the word botany, John Ray. Her crisp prose is complemented by lavish, full-color illustrations (though strangely lacking is a portrait of one of the author's heroes, the aforementioned Theophrastus). The Renaissance developments are especially fascinating: the spectacular refinement of plant illustration in herbals, the establishment of botanical gardens, and the flood of new plant discoveries that came with the advent of world navigation. Pavord demonstrates convincingly how, from about the 15th century on, plants came to be an object of interest for their intrinsic value, not just for their medicinal, nutritive, or ritual purposes. There is much here for readers of all sorts, making this book a solid choice for large public collections. It is also highly recommended for special and academic collections, though professional botanists may wince at the short shrift given French botanist Joseph Pitton de Tournefort and Swedish taxonomist Carl Linnaeus.-Robert Eagan, Windsor P.L., Ont. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

About the Author

Anna Pavord is the gardening correspondent for the Independent and the author of eight previous books, including the bestselling The Tulip. She contributes to a number of magazines, both in the US and the UK and regularly fronts programmes for BBC Radio 3 and 4. She chairs the Gardens Panel of the National Trust and sits on the Parks and Gardens Panel of English Heritage. She lives in Dorset, England, where she spent thirty years restoring the garden of an old rectory. She has recently moved to a new house and started another garden. She is married and has three daughters.

Reviews

With this book, British author Pavord (The Tulip) quashes any notion that the history of plant taxonomy is a dull pursuit. Her story covers 2000 years of the search for order in the plant world, beginning in third-century B.C.E. Greece with Aristotle's great pupil Theophrastus and ending in late 17th-century England with the man who coined the word botany, John Ray. Her crisp prose is complemented by lavish, full-color illustrations (though strangely lacking is a portrait of one of the author's heroes, the aforementioned Theophrastus). The Renaissance developments are especially fascinating: the spectacular refinement of plant illustration in herbals, the establishment of botanical gardens, and the flood of new plant discoveries that came with the advent of world navigation. Pavord demonstrates convincingly how, from about the 15th century on, plants came to be an object of interest for their intrinsic value, not just for their medicinal, nutritive, or ritual purposes. There is much here for readers of all sorts, making this book a solid choice for large public collections. It is also highly recommended for special and academic collections, though professional botanists may wince at the short shrift given French botanist Joseph Pitton de Tournefort and Swedish taxonomist Carl Linnaeus.-Robert Eagan, Windsor P.L., Ont. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

'A passionate masterpiece' MAIL ON SUNDAY on THE TULIP 'Written by a scholar, reads like a thriller' DAILY TELEGRAPH on THE TULIP

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