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The Politics of Work-Family Policies
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Table of Contents

Preface; 1. Why work-family policies matter, and how best to study them; 2. Demographic and policy trends in OECD countries; 3. Familialist policies in France; 4. Germany enacts change; 5. Japan confronts low fertility and rapid aging; 6. The US relies on families and markets; 7. Evaluating work-family policies; 8. Why the US can't be Sweden.

Promotional Information

This book assesses which work-family policies work best, and explains why they are unlikely to be adopted everywhere.

About the Author

Patricia Boling is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Purdue University, Indiana. She is interested in how issues housed in the private sphere of the family get translated into negotiable political issues, and has written a book about the politics of intimate life, edited a book on new reproductive technologies, and authored various articles and chapters related to public-private distinctions in the US and in Japan. Having lived in Japan for three years, her research agenda has considered various practices that mostly occur in the intimacy of the body or family that raise issues of justice and equality both in Japan and around the world.

Reviews

'Family policy has been an area of remarkable innovation over the past two decades, driven by concerns about declining fertility rates and persistent gender inequity. Boling helps us understand what is driving this innovation, and why these initiatives have been more successful in some places than others.' Len Schoppa, University of Virginia
'In this ambitious book, Patricia Boling brings the comparativist's lens to the vitally important topic of how states succeed or falter in supporting working parents and their children. Rather than exploring the well-worn terrain of how 'Sweden does it best', she incisively asks what it is about states, political institutions, and political alliances that makes adoption of work-family policies more feasible in some countries than in others. This is an important book for all who care about improving individual well-being and opportunity across generations in twenty-first-century post-industrial societies.' Mary C. Brinton, Harvard University, Massachusetts
"Family policy has been an area of remarkable innovation over the past two decades, driven by concerns about declining fertility rates and persistent gender inequity. Boling helps us understand what is driving this innovation, and why these initiatives have been more successful in some places than others." Len Schoppa, University of Virginia
"In this ambitious book, Patricia Boling brings the comparativist's lens to the vitally important topic of how states succeed or falter in supporting working parents and their children. Rather than exploring the well-worn terrain of how 'Sweden does it best', she incisively asks what it is about states, political institutions, and political alliances that makes adoption of work-family policies more feasible in some countries than in others. This is an important book for all who care about improving individual well-being and opportunity across generations in twenty-first-century post-industrial societies." Mary C. Brinton, Harvard University

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