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Skyscrapers
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About the Author

Judith Dupre, New York Times bestselling author has written many books about architecture, including Bridges, Churches, and Monuments. She consults on large-scale infrastructure projects and lectures at Yale and other universities. She lives in New York. Visit www.judithdupre.com.

Reviews

"Breathtaking. Magnificent, unique, very special. Exquisite. One-of-a-kind. Well researched. Beautifully designed."--Robert J. Bruss, Tribune Media Services "Drama. Treachery. Innovation. Massive buildings. Bigger egos. Skyscrapers has it all."--Patrick J. Foye, Executive Director, Port Authority of New York & New Jersey "Dupre makes the most of a century of neck-craning architecture."--The Washington Post "Dupre captivates the eye, mind and imagination."--The New York Times Look up! Architectural historian Dupre, who's also written about bridges (Bridges: A History of the World's Most Important Spans), churches (Churches), and monuments (Monuments: America's History in Art and Memory), has updated her 1996 "instant classic" with 15 new essays and plenty of new contenders for World's Tallest Building. Reflecting the many changes in the world, and in the world of architecture, since 1996, the new edition looks at the myriad "supertalls" in China and elsewhere, the wave of "green" skyscrapers, and the barrier-busting work of architects such as Adrian Smith, who designed the current tall champion, Burj Khalifa in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The Burj Khalifa won't hold the title for long: Smith and Gordon Gill Architecture are busy working on the Kingdom Tower in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, which will top out at one kilometer. It's scheduled to be completed in 2018. The book's design is supertall itself, measuring 9? x 18? to really make the gorgeous renderings and photos pop. Dupre starts with the world's first skyscraper (Chicago's Home Insurance Building, built in 1885, demolished in 1931) and proceeds through the classics like the Flatiron Building, the Chrysler Building, and the Empire State Building in New York, Marina City and the Sears Tower (now the Willis Tower) in Chicago, to newer achievements in building height located in London, Atlanta, Sweden, Asia and various Arab countries. I spent a lot of time gazing at the photos of Cesar Pelli's beautiful design for the Petronas Towers in Juala Lumpur, Malaysia, the tallest building(s) in the world from 1997?2004. Dupre writes: Although Pelli was charged with creating a design that would be uniquely Malaysian, there was little authentically Malaysian design in the city: British Colonialists had built its most significant buildings and its commercial structures were rendered in a nondescript International Style. The only truly traditional constructions were short bamboo structures with thatched roofs. Instead, Pelli said he "tried to respond to the climate, to the dominant Islamic culture, and to the sense of form and patterning that I could perceive in traditional Malaysian building." Evidently, the architect achieved that aim: In 2004, Pelli was awarded the Aga Khan Award for Architecture for the towers' design. The dear departed (can you say that about a structure?) World Trade Center towers are documented as well?the photo representation is of the double "towers of light" that make their appearance every September 11. The single-spire replacement for the towers, which LJ staffers can see out our office window, is also documented. That much-delayed project is due to be completed next year. Look up! Architectural historian Dupre, who's also written about bridges ("Bridges: A History of the World's Most Important Spans"), churches ("Churches)," and monuments ("Monuments: America's History in Art and Memory"), has updated her 1996 "instant classic" with 15 new essays and plenty of new contenders for World's Tallest Building. Reflecting the many changes in the world, and in the world of architecture, since 1996, the new edition looks at the myriad "supertalls" in China and elsewhere, the wave of "green" skyscrapers, and the barrier-busting work of architects such as Adrian Smith, who designed the current tall champion, Burj Khalifa in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The Burj Khalifa won't hold the title for long: Smith and Gordon Gill Architecture are busy working on the Kingdom Tower in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, which will top out at one kilometer. It's scheduled to be completed in 2018. The book's design is supertall itself, measuring 9? x 18? to really make the gorgeous renderings and photos pop. Dupre starts with the world's first skyscraper (Chicago's Home Insurance Building, built in 1885, demolished in 1931) and proceeds through the classics like the Flatiron Building, the Chrysler Building, and the Empire State Building in New York, Marina City and the Sears Tower (now the Willis Tower) in Chicago, to newer achievements in building height located in London, Atlanta, Sweden, Asia and various Arab countries. I spent a lot of time gazing at the photos of Cesar Pelli's beautiful design for the Petronas Towers in Juala Lumpur, Malaysia, the tallest building(s) in the world from 1997?2004. Dupre writes: Although Pelli was charged with creating a design that would be uniquely Malaysian, there was little authentically Malaysian design in the city: British Colonialists had built its most significant buildings and its commercial structures were rendered in a nondescript International Style. The only truly traditional constructions were short bamboo structures with thatched roofs. Instead, Pelli said he "tried to respond to the climate, to the dominant Islamic culture, and to the sense of form and patterning that I could perceive in traditional Malaysian building." Evidently, the architect achieved that aim: In 2004, Pelli was awarded the Aga Khan Award for Architecture for the towers' design. The dear departed (can you say that about a structure?) World Trade Center towers are documented as well?the photo representation is of the double "towers of light" that make their appearance every September 11. The single-spire replacement for the towers, which LJ staffers can see out our office window, is also documented. That much-delayed project is due to be completed next year." "Unique in scale and design, and packed with eye-popping photographs --Richard Helm "The Edmonton Journal " [A] handsome compendium, which is as witty in its lanky format as it is fascinating within. --Bill Thompson "The Post and Courier (Charleston, SC) " Skyscrapers is ingeniously shaped this tall and skinny volume is the perfect canvas for full-page black-and-white photographs and illustrations of well-known classics .But this isn t just a celebratory picture book. Ms Dupr is a scholar interested in the aesthetic and environmental issues raised by supertall architecture. Skyscrapers is chock-full of historical context as it projects the implications and future prospects of metal and glass that reach for the sky. --Manuel Mendoza "Dallas Morning News " Judith Dupr skillfully couples a narrative with stunning photographs and factoids that distinguish this skyscraper-shaped book from so many others. --Sam Roberts "The New York Times " Talk about an ideal match of subject and form .the stunning array of black-and-white photographs that accompany Dupre 's incisive, fact-filled text capture both the mass and soaring aspirations of the structures --Hedy Weiss "Chicago Sun-Times " ."..[A] handsome compendium, which is as witty in its lanky format as it is fascinating within." -- Bill Thompson "The Post and Courier (Charleston, SC)" "Skyscrapers is ingeniously shaped...this tall and skinny volume...is the perfect canvas for full-page black-and-white photographs and illustrations of well-known classics....But this isn't just a celebratory picture book. Ms Dupre is a scholar interested in the aesthetic and environmental issues raised by supertall architecture. Skyscrapers is chock-full of historical context as it projects the implications and future prospects of metal and glass that reach for the sky." -- Manuel Mendoza "Dallas Morning News" "Judith Dupre skillfully couples a narrative with stunning photographs and factoids that distinguish this skyscraper-shaped book from so many others." -- Sam Roberts "The New York Times" .,."[A] handsome compendium, which is as witty in its lanky format as it is fascinating within." -- Bill Thompson "The Post and Courier (Charleston, SC)" "Talk about an ideal match of subject and form....the stunning array of black-and-white photographs that accompany Dupre's incisive, fact-filled text capture both the mass and soaring aspirations of the structures..." -- Hedy Weiss "Chicago Sun-Times"

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