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Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility
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Table of Contents

List of Figures Glossary Preface: Why CSR Matters Plan of the Book Acknowledgments PART I: CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY Chapter 1: What Is CSR? A New Definition of CSR The Evolution of CSR Foundations of CSR Strategic CSR Debate Questions for Discussion and Review Chapter 2: The Driving Forces of CSR Affluence Sustainability Globalization Communications Brands Strategic CSR Debate Questions for Discussion and Review Chapter 3: Corporate Rights and Responsibilities Corporate Rights Corporate Responsibilities Strategic CSR Debate Questions for Discussion and Review Part I Case Study: Religion Religion and Capitalism Islamic Finance Strategic CSR Debate Questions for Discussion and Review Next Steps PART II: A STAKEHOLDER PERSPECTIVE Chapter 4: Stakeholder Theory Who Is a Stakeholder Which Stakeholders Should Be Prioritized? Strategic CSR Debate Questions for Discussion and Review Chapter 5: Corporate Stakeholder Responsibility CSR: A Corporate Responsibility? CSR: A Stakeholder Responsibility? Engaged Stakeholders Strategic CSR Debate Questions for Discussion and Review Chapter 6: Who Owns the Corporation? History of the Corporation Shareholders Own Stock Fiduciary Duties Shareholders Versus Stakeholders Strategic CSR Debate Questions for Discussion and Review Part II Case Study: Impact Investing Socially Responsible Investing Values-Based Funds Social Impact Bonds Strategic CSR Debate Questions for Discussion and Review Next Steps PART III: An Economic Perspective Chapter 7: The Pursuit of Profit Markets Profit Social Progress Strategic CSR Debate Questions for Discussion and Review Chapter 8: Incentives and Compliance Voluntary Versus Mandatory Behavioral Economics Walmart Is Walmart Good for Society? Strategic CSR Debate Questions for Discussion and Review Chapter 9: Accountability Defining CSR Measuring CSR Pricing CSR Strategic CSR Debate Questions for Discussion and Review Part III Case Study: Financial Crisis The Great Recession Moral Hazard Global Capitalism Occupy Wall Street Countrywide Bank of America Strategic CSR Debate Questions for Discussion and Review Next Steps PART IV: A STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVE Chapter 10: Strategy + CSR What Is Strategy? Competing Strategy Perspectives The Integration of Strategy and CSR The CSR Threshold Strategic CSR Debate Questions for Discussion and Review Chapter 11: CSR as a Strategic Filter The CSR Filter The Market for CSR The CSR Filter in Action Strategic CSR Debate Questions for Discussion and Review Chapter 12: Strategic CSR Defining Strategic CSR Strategic CSR Is Not an Option Strategic CSR Is Business Strategic CSR Debate Questions for Discussion and Review Part IV Case Study: Supply Chain An Ethical Supply Chain An Unethical Supply Chain A Strategic Supply Chain Strategic CSR Debate Questions for Discussion and Review Next Steps PART V: A SUSTAINABLE PERSPECTIVE Chapter 13: Sustainability Sustainable Development Waste Beyond Sustainability Strategic CSR Debate Questions for Discussion and Review Chapter 14: Implementing CSR Strategic Planning Short- to Medium-Term Implementation Medium- to Long-Term Implementation The Socially Responsible Firm Strategic CSR Debate Questions for Discussion and Review Chapter 15: Sustainable Value Creation Values, Morals, and Business Ethics Creating Value Values-Based Business Strategic CSR Is Good Business Strategic CSR Debate Questions for Discussion and Review Part V Case Study: Employees The Gig Economy Employee-Centered Firms Strategic CSR Debate Questions for Discussion and Review Final Thoughts Endnotes Company Index Subject Index About the Author

About the Author

David Chandler (david.chandler@ucdenver.edu) is Professor of Management at the University of Colorado Denver Business School. His research focuses on the dynamic interface between the firm and its institutional environment. His research has been published in journals that include Administrative Science Quarterly, Organization Science, Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, and Journal of Management. Additional related publications include the book Sustainable Value Creation (Routledge, 2e, 2021). He received his PhD in Management from The University of Texas at Austin.

Reviews

I've been using this text to support learning in two classes I teach, Managing for Sustainability and Global Corporate Social Responsibility. I found it to be a strong support for my approach, which involves situation studies and roundtable discussions pertinent to each course. David Chandler's approach works well for many reasons.

* Current discussions in our US government particularly render it difficult to focus on public policy influences on sustainability and social responsibility, or to promote ethical actions based on altruism. Business administration students may be biased toward a tendency to perceive profits as paramount, and non-business students attracted to the course topics may end up affirming one another's perceived goodness without learning how to negotiate corporate-influenced environments.
* A vision of perfection may supplant the good that can come of more strategic CSR approaches. A firm's capacity to genuinely address social challenges ranging from environmental concerns to social equity need not preclude profitability. Corporations' opening to, and funding of, design and innovation can be important drivers to managing the natural resources left in the world and creating new ways to benefit everyone.
* While taking some issue with Milton Friedman's notions of what business responsibility comprises (solely to make money), Chandler believes that CSR students have much to learn from the Nobel-prize winning economist, and I agree. Profitability, however, does need to be viewed over the long term as much as the short term. What do we profit in a desolate, ruined environment? If corporations come to the table in meaningful discussion surrounding the balance we "sustainers" seek, perhaps we would move in the right direction. There would be no losers, only investors.
* Strategic CSR seeks to assure profitability through enhanced relationship with all stakeholders, not just shareholders. As Chandler asserts, CSR is a responsibility among firms to meet the needs of their stakeholders and it's a responsibility among stakeholders to hold firms to account for their actions.

Today's interplay of business and society is complex and fraught with nuance. Conversations and understanding must evolve further to ensure a sustainable global future. This book offers plenty of material - and outstanding faculty resources - to support an instructor's approach to helping students learn to mindfully manage people and resources in the world as it is, to the benefit of all: people, planet, and economic stability. -- Linda Clark-Borre

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