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Unsettling Food Politics
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Over the past 25 years, activists, farmers and scholars have been arguing that the industrialized global food system erodes democracy, perpetuates injustices, undermines population health and is environmentally unsustainable. In an attempt to resist these effects, activists have proposed alternative food networks that draw on ideas and practices from pre-industrial agrarian smallholder farming, as well as contemporary peasant movements. This book uses current debates over Michel Foucault's method of genealogy as a practice of critique and historical problematization of the present to reveal the historical constitution of contemporary alternative food discourses. While alternative food activists appeal to food sovereignty and agrarian discourses to counter the influence of neoliberal agricultural policies, these discourses remain entangled with colonial logics. In particular, the influence of Enlightenment ideas of improvement, colonial practices of agriculture as a means to establish ownership, and anthropocentric relations to the land. In combination with the genealogical analysis, this book brings continental political philosophy into conversation with Indigenous theories of sovereignty and alternative food discourse in order to open new spaces for thinking about food and politics in contemporary Australia.
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Table of Contents

Introduction: beach barbeques, dispossession and problematization / 1. Cultivating sovereignty: agriculture, racism, and the problem of settling Australia / 2. Producing `Little England': farmers, graziers, and the creation of home / 3. Alternative problems, alternative solutions: security and sovereignty in the global food system / 4. Whiteness and the contested spaces of alternative food / 5. Unsettling food sovereignty in Australia / 6. Whose sovereignty? Competing sovereignties and the tactical return to rights / 7. Negotiating relations: food politics after the Uluru Statement from the Heart / Bibliography / Index

About the Author

Christopher Mayes is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Centre for Values, Ethics and the Law in Medicine at the University of Sydney. He is the author of The Biopolitics of Lifestyle: Foucault, Ethics and Healthy Choices (forthcoming).

Reviews

Mayes' book is an important and, yes, unsettling reminder that in the Australian context, too, a return to smallholder farming as an antidote to the world's food woes, is a return to an imaginary thick with dispossession and unfree labour.--Julie Guthman, Professor of Social Sciences at the University of California, Santa Cruz Too often debates around food focus on the individual consumer and consumer choice without acknowleding the way in which those choices are determined by the culture of possibilities in which the consumer is situated. The impact of current food practices on health, the environment, and social inequity cannot be addressed merely by changing individual habits; rather, food justice will require fundamental changes in the systems of production and distribution that determine what and how we eat. This important and timely book exposes the complicity of commodity agriculture not only in the global obesity crisis and environmental injustice, but also in the food insecurity of vulnerable populations. Drawing on the resources of Foucault, Mayes demonstrates convincingly the role of agriculture in the project of colonialism and its historic injustices. Though he focuses primarily on Australia, his analysis of the way in which contemporary agricultural practices reflect racism and the dispossesion of indigenous peoples has a global reach. Mayes does not only offer a critique of the provision of food as a biopolitical act that privileges some bodies over others; he also offers positive strategies for transforming our current food culture in order to address the injustices inherent in it. As he argues, by recovering the knowledges of indigenous peoples and by giving the marginalized a place at the table where decisions are made, we may be able to revolutionize current food practices in ways that will not only address inequity, but also improve the well-being of each and all.--Mary C. Rawlinson, Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Philosophy, Stony Brook University Unsettling Food Politics is an extraordinary rethinking of food sovereignty politics beyond formal sovereignty structures and discriminatory discourses of settler-colonial states. Fashioning a reflexive historical method to construct a substantive sovereignty of indigeneity, Mayes raises profound ethical questions for food sovereignty movements and practices within states and farming systems founded on indigenous subjugation. This is powerful food for thought.--Philip David McMichael, Professor, Department of Development Sociology, Cornell University This is the book we have been waiting for. Unsettling Food Politics finally provides the critical study of settler-colonial food regimes that we so desperately need today. Historically grounded and well argued, this book is essential reading.--Thomas Nail, Associate Professor, Department of Philosophy, University of Denver

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