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Wired for War
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About the Author

Dr Singer is considered one the world's leading experts on changes in 21st century warfare. He has written for the full range of major media and journals, including Boston Globe, L.A. Times, New Times, amongst many others. He is also the author of Corporate Warriors: The Rise of the Privatized Military Industry and Children at War. He is also a founder and organizer of the US-Islamic World Forum, a global conference that brings together leaders from across the US and the Muslim world.

Reviews

Singer, who envisioned private military contractors and child soldiers before they became (sadly) commonplace, explains how war is evolving to be fought by robots. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.

aP. W. Singer has fashioned a definitive text on the future of war around the subject of robots. In no previous book have I gotten such an intrinsic sense of what the military future will be like.a a Robert D. Kaplan, author of "Imperial Grunts: The American Military on the Ground" aSinger's book is as important (very) as it is readable (highly), as much a fascinating account of new technology as it is a challenging appraisal of the strategic, political and ethical questions that we must now face. This book needs to be widely read -- not just within the defense community but by anyone interested in the most fundamental questions of how our society and others will look at war itself.a aAnthony Lake, former U.S. National Security Advisor and Professor of Diplomacy, School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University aDrawing from sources spanning popular culture and hard science, Singer reveals how the relationship between man and robot is changing the very nature of war. He details technology that has, until now, been the stuff of science fiction: lethal machines that can walk on water or hover outside windows, machines joined in networks or thinking for themselves. I found this book fascinating, deep, entertaining, and frightening.a a Howard Gordon, writer and executive producer of "24, The X-Files," and "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" "Lively, penetrating, and wise ... A warmly human (even humorous) account of robotics and other military technologies that focuses where it should: on us." aRichard Danzig, former Secretary of the Navy and Director, National Semiconductor Corporation aWill wars someday be fought by Terminator-like machines? In this provocative andentertaining new book, one of our brightest young strategic thinkers suggests the answer may well be ayes.a Singeras sprightly survey of robotics technology takes the reader from battlefields and cutting-edge research labs to the dreams of science fiction writers. In the process, he forces us to grapple with the strategic and ethical implications of the anew new thinga in war.a aMax Boot, Senior Fellow for National Security Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations; author of "The Savage Wars of Peace" and "War Made New" aWeaving together immaculate academic research with a fan boyas lexicon of popular culture, Singer looks at the people and technologies beta-testing tomorrow's wars today. The result is a book both hilarious and hair-raising that poses profound ethical questions about the creation and use of ever more powerful killing machines.a aGideon Yago, writer, "MTV News" aBlew my f***ing minda]This book is awesome.a aJohn Stewart, "The Daily Show "A superb booka]If you read Wired for War you'll actually get a sense for the complexities that we are creating. We're not making a simpler world with these robots I don't think at all, I think we're making a more complex world, and that is something I got from this great book. aGeneral James Mattis, USMC, NATO Supreme Allied Commander for Transformation and the Commander of U.S. Joint Forces Command "In his latest work, "Wired for War," Singer confesses his passion for science fiction as he introduces us to a glimpse of things to comeathe new technologies that will shape wars of the future. His new book addresses some ominous and little-discussed questions about the military, technology, andmachinery." a "Harperas" .,."A vivid picture of the current controversies and dazzling possibilities of war in the digital age." a"Kirkus Reviews" aGenuinely Provocativea a "Book Forum" "a]Full of vignettes on the use of robotics, first-person interviews with end- users, what has occurred in the robotics industry in its support of the nation, and what is "coming soon." Some of the new ideas are just downright mind-blowing..." aThe Armchair General "An admitted war geek, P.W. Singer obsessesaover the course of 400-plus pagesa about the growing role of robots in combat. His tone is oddly jovial considering the unsettling subject matter, but you won't find a more comprehensive look at mechanized death outside science fiction." a"Details Magazine" "If you want the whole story of remote warfare, pick up a copy of Wired for War, in which Peter Singer, a fellow of the non-profit Brookings Institution in Washington DC, exhaustively documents the Pentagon's penchant for robotics. Think of it as the next step in the mechanisation of war: swords and arrows, guns, artillery, rockets, bombers, robots." a "The New Scientist" aP.W. Singer has fashioned a definitive text on the future of war around the subject of robots. In no previous book have I gotten such an intrinsic sense of what the military future will be.a a Robert Kaplan, author of "Imperial Grunts" a"Wired for War" is a wild ride. Drawing from sources spanning popular culture and hard science, Singer reveals how the relationship between man and robot is changing the nature of warfare. He details technology that has, until now, been the stuff of science fiction: lethal machines that can walk on water or hover outside windows, machines joined in networks or thinking for themselves. Singeras appreciation for the human minds behind these machines is real, but so is his warning that the implications of this revolution are poorly understood.a a Howard Gordon, writer and executive producer of "24, The X-Files," and "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" aSinger's book is as important (very) as it is readable (highly), as much a fascinating account of new technology as it is a challenging appraisal of the strategic, political and ethical questions that we must now face. This book needs to be widely read --not just within the defense community but by anyone interested in the most fundamental questions of how our and other societies will look at war itself.a a Anthony Lake, 18th U.S. National Security Advisor aWill wars someday be fought by Terminator-like machines? In this provocative and entertaining new book, one of our brightest young strategic thinkers suggests the answer may well be ayes.a Singeras sprightly survey of robotics technology takes the reader from battlefields and cutting-edge research labs to the dreams of science fictionwriters. In the process, he forces us to grapple with the strategic and ethical implications of the anew new thinga in war.a a Max Boot, author of "The Savage Wars of Peace" and "War Made New," aLively, penetrating, and wise ... A warmly human (even humorous) account of robotics and other military technologies that focuses where it should: on us.a Richard Danzig, 71st Secretary of the Navy aWeaving together immaculate academic research with a fan boy's lexicon of popular culture, "Wired for War" looks at the people and technologies beta-testing tomorrow's wars today. The result is a book both hilarious and hair-raising that poses profound ethical questions about the creation and use of ever more powerful killing machines.a aGideon Yago, writer, "MTV News" aItas not science fiction, itas not fantasy, itas here now. Read "Wired For War," a Robert Young Pelton, author of "The Worldas Most Dangerous Places"

Brookings Institute fellow Singer (Children at War) believes that "we resist trying to research and understand change" in the making of war. Robotics promises to be the most comprehensive instrument of change in war since the introduction of gunpowder. Beginning with a brief and useful survey of robotics, Singer discusses its military applications during WWII, the arming and autonomy of robots at the turn of the century, and the broad influence of robotics on near-future battlefields. How, for example, can rules of engagement for unmanned autonomous machines be created and enforced? Can an artificial intelligence commit a war crime? Arguably more significant is Singer's provocative case that war itself will be redefined as technology creates increasing physical and emotional distance from combat. As robotics diminishes war's risks the technology diminishes as well the higher purposes traditionally used to justify it. Might that reduce humanity's propensity for war making? Or will robotics make war less humane by making it less human? Singer has more questions than answers-but it is difficult to challenge his concluding admonition to question and study the technologies of military robotics-while the chance remains. (Jan. 26) Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.

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