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Great SAS Missions [Region 4]
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An unique insight into the most daring and dangerous exploits of the worlds leading Special Forces unit. From its first mission, the successful destruction of Rommels airfields in the North African desert during World War II, to tracking down Saddam Hussains Scud missile launchers in the Gulf War, Britains Special Air Service regiment has proved itself time after time in high risk situations. Highlights of the series include the perfectly executed night raid on the Argentine Air Force during the Falklands War, and the storming of the Iranian Embassy in London, which made the SAS international heroes in the fight against terrorism. The missions themselves are brought to life through survivor and witness accounts, detailed and accurate reconstructions and cutting edge 3D graphics, which show the methodology behind the attack plans. 1. Birth of the SAS As the Panzers of Rommels Afrika Korps swept the British back into Egypt in 1941, a young commando lieutenant, David Stirling, persuaded his superiors to allow him to set up a special deep-penetration unit which could cause havoc behind enemy lines. Its first mission was a disaster but soon Stirling and the mavericks he had gathered proved that they had a valuable covert role to play. 2. Destroying Hitlers Airfields After its initial and near-fatal problems the SAS changed its tactics - using its own heavily-armed jeeps to strike deep behind enemy lines attacking German and Italian airfields and supply lines. By the time the fighting in North Africa ended, the exploits of the unit were fast becoming legend, but it had lost its founder and was again struggling to survive. 3. Deception on D-Day As the Allies landed on D-Day to begin the liberation of Europe, the SAS used the skills it had honed in the desert in this new theatre of war. On the night before the landings, teams were parachuted in to create havoc and distract the German defenders. Then the armed jeeps ranged deep behind the enemys lines attacking reinforcements and communications. 4. Hunting Hitlers Terror Weapons As the Allies broke out of their Normandy beachhead and swept towards the German border, the SAS continued its deep penetration role. But the regiment was also called on for other vital tasks: tracking down Hitlers mobile and elusive V-2 rocket launchers, and then hunting the Nazi war criminals that had killed members of the SAS in cold blood. 5. Destroying Hitlers Airfields After World War II the SAS was disbanded, but it was soon realised that its special skills would be needed in the volatile post-war situation.The regiment was clandestinely rebuilt and undertook a variety of secret missions.Then in 1981 it hit the headlines when terrorists holding hostages in the Iranian Embassy were swiftly and successfully eliminated and their captives freed. 6. Retaking the Falklands When the British Task Force sailed to take back the Falkand Islands from Argentine occupation, two squadrons of the SAS went with it. Over the next few weeks they were involved in a variety of surveillance missions, and a vital and brilliantly executed raid on an Argentine airstrip on Pebble Island which effectively eliminated all enemy air power on the Falklands. 7. Desert Storm Scudbusters In the Gulf wars of 1992 and 2003, the SAS returned to its roots as deep penetration teams fanned out into the Iraqi desert. Their missions ranged from disrupting supply lines and communications and raiding airfields, to the vital task of tracking down Saddam Husseins Scud missile launchers which were being used to deadly effect and threatening to destroy the coalition against him.

An unique insight into the most daring and dangerous exploits of the worlds leading Special Forces unit. From its first mission, the successful destruction of Rommels airfields in the North African desert during World War II, to tracking down Saddam Hussains Scud missile launchers in the Gulf War, Britains Special Air Service regiment has proved itself time after time in high risk situations. Highlights of the series include the perfectly executed night raid on the Argentine Air Force during the Falklands War, and the storming of the Iranian Embassy in London, which made the SAS international heroes in the fight against terrorism. The missions themselves are brought to life through survivor and witness accounts, detailed and accurate reconstructions and cutting edge 3D graphics, which show the methodology behind the attack plans. 1. Birth of the SAS As the Panzers of Rommels Afrika Korps swept the British back into Egypt in 1941, a young commando lieutenant, David Stirling, persuaded his superiors to allow him to set up a special deep-penetration unit which could cause havoc behind enemy lines. Its first mission was a disaster but soon Stirling and the mavericks he had gathered proved that they had a valuable covert role to play. 2. Destroying Hitlers Airfields After its initial and near-fatal problems the SAS changed its tactics - using its own heavily-armed jeeps to strike deep behind enemy lines attacking German and Italian airfields and supply lines. By the time the fighting in North Africa ended, the exploits of the unit were fast becoming legend, but it had lost its founder and was again struggling to survive. 3. Deception on D-Day As the Allies landed on D-Day to begin the liberation of Europe, the SAS used the skills it had honed in the desert in this new theatre of war. On the night before the landings, teams were parachuted in to create havoc and distract the German defenders. Then the armed jeeps ranged deep behind the enemys lines attacking reinforcements and communications. 4. Hunting Hitlers Terror Weapons As the Allies broke out of their Normandy beachhead and swept towards the German border, the SAS continued its deep penetration role. But the regiment was also called on for other vital tasks: tracking down Hitlers mobile and elusive V-2 rocket launchers, and then hunting the Nazi war criminals that had killed members of the SAS in cold blood. 5. Destroying Hitlers Airfields After World War II the SAS was disbanded, but it was soon realised that its special skills would be needed in the volatile post-war situation.The regiment was clandestinely rebuilt and undertook a variety of secret missions.Then in 1981 it hit the headlines when terrorists holding hostages in the Iranian Embassy were swiftly and successfully eliminated and their captives freed. 6. Retaking the Falklands When the British Task Force sailed to take back the Falkand Islands from Argentine occupation, two squadrons of the SAS went with it. Over the next few weeks they were involved in a variety of surveillance missions, and a vital and brilliantly executed raid on an Argentine airstrip on Pebble Island which effectively eliminated all enemy air power on the Falklands. 7. Desert Storm Scudbusters In the Gulf wars of 1992 and 2003, the SAS returned to its roots as deep penetration teams fanned out into the Iraqi desert. Their missions ranged from disrupting supply lines and communications and raiding airfields, to the vital task of tracking down Saddam Husseins Scud missile launchers which were being used to deadly effect and threatening to destroy the coalition against him.

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This is a Region 4 disc. A multi-region player may be required in order to play this disc in this part of the world.

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