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David Bowie AKA Space Oddity
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Album: David Bowie AKA Space Oddity (180 Gram Vinyl)
# Song Title   Time
  Disc 1
1)    Space Oddity (2015 Remastered Version) More Info...
2)    Unwashed And Somewhat Slightly Dazed (2015 Remastered Version) More Info...
3)    Letter To Hermione (2015 Remastered Version) More Info...
4)    Cygnet Committee (2015 Remastered Version) More Info...
  Disc 2
1)    Janine (2015 Remastered Version) More Info...
2)    An Occasional Dream (2015 Remastered Version) More Info...
3)    Wild Eyed Boy From Freecloud (2015 Remastered Version) More Info...
4)    God Knows I'm Good (2015 Remastered Version) More Info...
5)    Memory Of A Free Festival (2015 Remastered Version) More Info...
 

Album: David Bowie AKA Space Oddity (180 Gram Vinyl)
# Song Title   Time
  Disc 1
1)    Space Oddity (2015 Remastered Version) More Info...
2)    Unwashed And Somewhat Slightly Dazed (2015 Remastered Version) More Info...
3)    Letter To Hermione (2015 Remastered Version) More Info...
4)    Cygnet Committee (2015 Remastered Version) More Info...
  Disc 2
1)    Janine (2015 Remastered Version) More Info...
2)    An Occasional Dream (2015 Remastered Version) More Info...
3)    Wild Eyed Boy From Freecloud (2015 Remastered Version) More Info...
4)    God Knows I'm Good (2015 Remastered Version) More Info...
5)    Memory Of A Free Festival (2015 Remastered Version) More Info...
 
Product Description
Product Details
Performer Notes
  • SPACE ODDITY was originally released as MAN OF WORDS, MAN OF MUSIC on Mercury in 1969.
  • SPACE ODDITY is an Enhanced audio CD which contains regular audio tracks and multimedia computer files.
  • Personnel: David Bowie (vocals, 12-string guitar, organ, stylophone, kalimba); Keith Christmas (acoustic guitar); Tim Renwick, Mick Wayne (guitar); Paul Buckmaster (cello); Tony Visconti (flute, recorder, bass); Benny Marshall and Friends (harmonica); Rick Wakeman (electric harpsichord, Mellotron); John Lodge, Herbie Flowers (bass); Terry Cox, John Cambridge (drums).
  • Producers: Gus Dudgeon, Tony Visconti.
  • Engineers: Ken Scott, Malcolm Toft, Barry Sheffield.
  • Digitally remastered by Peter Mew & Nigel Reeve (1999, Abbey Road Studios, London, England).
  • When David Bowie's second album appeared in late 1969, he was riding high. His first ever hit single, the super-topical "Space Oddity," had scored on the back of the moon landing that summer, and so distinctive an air did it possess that, for a moment, its maker really did seem capable of soaring as high as Major Tom. Sadly, it was not to be. "Space Oddity" aside, Bowie possessed very little in the way of commercial songs, and the ensuing album (his second) emerged as a dense, even rambling, excursion through the folky strains that were the last glimmering of British psychedelia. Indeed, the album's most crucial cut, the lengthy "Cygnet Committee," was nothing less than a discourse on the death of hippiness, shot through with such bitterness and bile that it remains one of Bowie's all-time most important numbers -- not to mention his most prescient. The verse that unknowingly name-checks both the Sex Pistols ("the guns of love") and the Damned is nothing if not a distillation of everything that brought punk to its knees a full nine years later. The remainder of the album struggles to match the sheer vivacity of "Cygnet Committee," although "Unwashed and Slightly Dazed" comes close to packing a disheveled rock punch, all the more so as it bleeds into a half minute or so of Bowie wailing "Don't Sit Down" -- an element that, mystifyingly, was hacked from the 1972 reissue of the album. "Janine" and "An Occasional Dream" are pure '60s balladry, and "God Knows I'm Good" takes a well-meant but somewhat clumsy stab at social comment. Two final tracks, however, can be said to pinpoint elements of Bowie's own future. The folk epic "Wild Eyed Boy from Freecloud" (substantially reworked from the B-side of the hit) would remain in Bowie's live set until as late as 1973, while a re-recorded version of the mantric "Memory of a Free Festival" would become a single the following year, and marked Bowie's first studio collaboration with guitarist Mick Ronson. The album itself however, proved another dead end in a career that was gradually piling up an awful lot of such things. ~ Dave Thompson
Professional Reviews
Spin (p.82) - "[This is] more art-folk and hippie-ish than his celebrated work. Strummed 12-string acoustic guitars and minor chords dominate..."

Q (Magazine) (p.136) - 4 stars out of 5 -- "SPACE ODDITY was where Bowie threw off his folk-rock cloak to reveal the scrawny glam rocker beneath."

Mojo (Publisher) (3/00, p.122) - "Bowie's second album, the one on which he finally ditched all iontentions of becoming a second Anthony Newley..." n

Record Collector (magazine) (p.91) - 3 stars out of 5 -- "[I]t's mish-mash of styles and strummy experiments suggest he was still trying to settle on an identity."

Uncut (magazine) - 3 stars out of 5 -- "[The album] takes a folksy turn on the lovely acoustic confessionals 'Letter to Hermione' and 'An Occasional Dream'..."
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