We use cookies to provide essential features and services. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies .

×

Warehouse Stock Clearance Sale

Grab a bargain today!

Introductory Thermodynamics and Fluids Mechanics
By

Rating

Product Description
Product Details

Table of Contents

Contents
List of tables ix
Preface x
Part 1 Thermodynamics 1
Chapter 1 Energy and humanity 3
1.1 The need for energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1.2 Energy conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.3 Heat engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.4 Availability of heat energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.5 Sources of energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.6 Solar energy-photosynthesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.7 Solar radiation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1.8 Wind and wave energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
1.9 Hydroelectric power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1.10 Nuclear energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1.11 Tidal energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1.12 Geothermal energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1.13 Fossil fuels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1.14 Depletion of stored fuel reserves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1.15 Energy conservation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Problems 26
Chapter 2 Basic concepts 29
2.1 The nature of matter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
2.2 Properties and processes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
2.3 Mass ................................................... 32
2.4 Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
2.5 Density . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
2.6 Relative density . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
2.7 Specific volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
2.8 Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
2.9 Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
2.10 Pressure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
2.11 Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
2.12 System and black-box analysis of a system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
2.13 Reciprocating piston-and-cylinder mechanism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Problems 44
V
vi Contents
Chapter 3 Energy 47
3.1 Energy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
3.2 Potential energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
3.3 Kinetic energy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
3.4 Work................................................... 50
3.5 Pressure-volume diagram. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
3.6 Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
3.7 Heat.................................................... 57
3.8 Chemical energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
3.9 Internal energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
3.10 Nuclear energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Problems 62
Chapter 4 Closed and open systems 66
4.1 Closed system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
4.2 Non-flow energy equation and its applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
4.3 Isolated systems with no phase change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
4.4 Isolated systems with a phase change. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
4.5 Bomb calorimeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
4.6 Open systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 5
4.7 Mass flow in open systems.................................. 76
4.8 Steady-flow energy equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
4.9 Turbine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
4.10 Steam generator (boiler). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
4.11 Heat exchanger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
4.12 Gas calorimeter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Problems 86
Chapter 5 Gases 90
5.1 Perfect or ideal gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
5.2 General gas equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
5.3 Specific heat capacity of a gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
5.4 Internal energy and enthalpy change in a gas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
5.5 Constant-pressure process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
5.6 Constant-volume process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
5.7 Isothermal process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
5.8 Polytropic process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
5.9 Adiabatic (isentropic) process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Problems 114
Chapter 6
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
6.7
Heat engines 118
Definition of a heat engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Essentials of a heat engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Efficiency of a heat engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Maximum efficiency of a heat engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Types of heat engine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Carnot cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Stirling cycle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Contents vii
6.8 Otto cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
6.9 Diesel cycle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
6.10 Dual cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
6.11 Two-stroke engines........................................ 142
6.12 Joule cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Problems 146
Chapter 7 Heat-engine performance 150
7.1 Power output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
7.2 Heat-supply rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
7.3 Efficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
7.4 Specific fuel consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
7.5 Indicated power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
7.6 Friction power. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
7.7 Mechanical efficiency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
7.8 Indicated thermal efficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
7.9 Volumetric efficiency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
7.10 Morse test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
7.11 Energy balance for a heat engine ............................. 166
7.12 Performance curves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Problems 172
Part 2 Fluid mechanics 111
Chapter 8 Basic properties of fluids 179
8.1 Types of fluid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
8.2 Properties of a fluid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
8.3 Viscosity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
8.4 Saturation vapour temperature and pressure of a liquid . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
8.5 Environmental impact...................................... 184
Problems 186
Chapter 9 Compon ents and their selection 189
9.1 Pipes, tubes and ducts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
9.2 Pipe fittings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
9.3 Valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
9.4 Filters and strainers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
9.5 Storage vessels and tanks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
9.6 Nozzles and spray heads. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
9.7 Gauges and instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
9.8 Flow measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
9.9 Fluid-power equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
9.10 Selection of fluid components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Problems 211
Chapter 10 Fluid statics 214
10.1 Basic principles of fluid statics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
10.2 Pressure variation with depth in a liquid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
10.3 Piezometers and manometers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
viii Contents
10.4 Static-fluid-pressure forces on surfaces ....................... . 223
227
229
10.5 Buoyancy force .......................................... .
Problems
Chapter 11
11.1
11.2
11.3
11.4
11.5
11.6
Fluid flow
Basic principles .......................................... .
Volume-flow and mass-flow rates ........................... .
Continuity equation ...................................... .
Head .................................................. .
Bernoulli equation ....................................... .
Head loss ............................................... .
Problems
235
235
237
238
240
241
248
251
Chapter 12 Fluid power 254
254
255
257
257
258
261
12.1 Fluid power and head ..................................... .
12.2 Fluid power and pressure head .............................. .
12.3 Fluid power and head loss ................................. .
12.4 Efficiency of fluid machinery ............................... .
12.5 Bernoulli equation with fluid machinery ...................... .
Problems
Chapter 13
13.1
13.2
13.3
13.4
13.5
13.6
13.7
Forces developed by flowing fluids
The impulse-momentum equation ........................... .
Fluid jet striking a perpendicular flat surface ................... .
Fluid jet striking an inclined flat surface ...................... .
Fluid jet striking a curved surface ........................... .
Fluid jet striking a moving surface ........................... .
Fluid jet striking a series of moving surfaces ................... .
Enclosed fluids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... .
Problems
266
266
268
269
271
273
274
276
279
Solutions to self-test problems 283
Appendixes
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Index
10
11
12
13
Principal symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307
Principal equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309
Approximate relative atomic and molecular masses of some elements 313
Specific heat capacity of some substances (medium-temperature range) 314
Pressure-height relationship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315
Characteristic gas constant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316
Isothermal work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
Polytropic pressure-volume-temperature relationships. . . . . . . . . . . . 318
Polytropic work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320
Adiabatic index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321
Carnot efficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322
Otto-cycle efficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 324
Proof of Archimedes principle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326
327
List of Tables
1.1 Typical energy uses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.2 Significant energy-conversion processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1.3 Typical energy-conversion efficiencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
3.1 Some forms of energy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
5.1 Comparison summary of gas processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113

Ask a Question About this Product More...
Write your question below:
Look for similar items by category
Item ships from and is sold by Fishpond Retail Limited.
Back to top